Off to Ireland for “Code and the City” Workshop http://ift.tt/1nfopuW Shannon
via Stamen

via Stamen

I’ll be at the National University of Ireland, in County Kildare, this coming week, for the “Code and the City” workshop. I’m super-honored to have been invited to take part in a conversation with folks I admire so greatly. We begin at 10am on Wednesday 9/3 and wrap up at 5pm on Thursday 9/4.

September 3

10.00-10.30: Welcome, opening talk by Rob Kitchin

10.30-12.30: Session 1: Automation / Algorithms

“Cities in Code: How Software Repositories Express Urban Life”
Adrian Mackenzie, Sociology, Lancaster University

“Autonomy and Automation in the Coded City”
Sam Kinsley, Geography, University of Exeter

“Interfacing Urban Intelligence”
Shannon Mattern, Media Studies, New School NY

12.30-13.30: Lunch

13.30-15.30: Session 2: Abstraction and Urbanization

“Encountering the City at Hackathons”
Sophia Maalsen and Sung-Yueh Perng, National University of Ireland, Maynooth

“Disclosing Disaster? A Study of Ethics, Praxeology and Phenomenology in a Mobile World”
Monika Büscher, With Michael Liegl, Katrina Petersen, Mobilities.Lab, Lancaster University, UK

“Riot’s Ratio, on the Genealogy of Agent-Based Modeling and the Cities of Civil War”
Matthew Fuller and Graham Harwood, Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths

15.30-16.00: coffee break

16.00-18.00: Session 3: Social and Locative Media

“Digital Social Interactions in the City: Reflecting on Location-Based Social Media”
Luigina Ciolfi, Human-Centred Computing, Sheffield Hallam University

“A Window, a Message, or a Medium? Learning About Cities from Instagram”
Lev Manovich, Computer Science, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

“Feeling Place in the City: Strange Ontologies, Foursquare and Location-Based Social Media”
Leighton Evans, National University of Ireland Maynooth

“Mobility in the Actually Existing Smart City: Developing a Multilayered Model for the Mobile Computing Dispositif”
Jim Merricks White, National University of Ireland, Maynooth

September 4

9.30 tea/coffee

10.00-12.00: Session 4: Knowledge Classification and Ontology

“Cities and Context: The Codification of Small Areas through Geodemographic Classification”
Alex Singleton, Geography, University of Liverpool

“The City and the Feudal Internet: Examining Institutional Materialities”
Paul Dourish, Informatics, UC Irvine

“From Jerusalem to Kansas City: New Geopolitics and the Semantic Web”
Heather Ford and Mark Graham, Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford

12.00-13.00: lunch

13.00-15.00: Session 5: Governance

“From Community Access to Community Calculation: Exploring Alternative Urban Governance Through Code”
Alison Powell, Media & Communications, LSE

“Code and the Socio-Spatial Stratification of the City”
Agnieszka Leszczynski, Geography, University of Birmingham

“The Cryptographic City”
David M. Berry, Media & Communication, University of Sussex

15.00-15.30: coffee break

15.30-17.00: Session 6 – discussion/wrap up

http://ift.tt/1nfopv1
“Review Essay: Fighting for Tacit Knowledge

The increasing popularity of praxeological approaches in the social sciences over the past couple of years has initiated an ongoing theoretical discussion of the concept of tacit knowledge. However, these debates often fail to take into account concrete empirical studies. With her book “Fighting Skills: A Sociology of Practical Knowledge,” Larissa SCHINDLER provides an ethnographic study that examines practices mediating tacit knowledge in the context of learning the martial art Ninjutsu. Next to an in-depth analysis of processes of knowledge transfer in Ninjutsu classes, SCHINDLER aims to contribute to broader sociological debates. In my review essay, I will discuss the methodological implications of SCHINDLER’s study, illustrate the analytic strengths of her work, and try to identify possible points of departure for future research. Even though SCHINDLER falls short of fully realizing her theoretical ambitions, she nonetheless provides an exceptional contribution to praxeological-microsociological scholarship with the potential to stimulate further discussion concerning matters of tacit knowledge and beyond.

URN: http://ift.tt/1zPjoPr

Alexander Antony http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

The increasing popularity of praxeological approaches in the social sciences over the past couple of years has initiated an ongoing theoretical discussion of the concept of tacit knowledge. However, these debates often fail to take into account concrete empirical studies. With her book “Fighting Skills: A Sociology of Practical Knowledge,” Larissa SCHINDLER provides an ethnographic study that examines practices mediating tacit knowledge in the context of learning the martial art Ninjutsu. Next to an in-depth analysis of processes of knowledge transfer in Ninjutsu classes, SCHINDLER aims to contribute to broader sociological debates. In my review essay, I will discuss the methodological implications of SCHINDLER’s study, illustrate the analytic strengths of her work, and try to identify possible points of departure for future research. Even though SCHINDLER falls short of fully realizing her theoretical ambitions, she nonetheless provides an exceptional contribution to praxeological-microsociological scholarship with the potential to stimulate further discussion concerning matters of tacit knowledge and beyond.

URN: http://ift.tt/1zPjoPr

— Review Essay: Fighting for Tacit Knowledge http://ift.tt/1C8GLax Alexander Antony Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research
“One Bird in the Hand …: The Local Organization of Surveys and Qualitative Data

In many organizations, and among many researchers, there is considerable resistance to the systematic large scale storage of survey data. Thereby, not only data storage but also work-flow organization and documentation are often left to the individual researcher. Such practice leads to inefficiencies due to a lack of positive specialization effects and to problems in traceability due to the existence of small-scale ad hoc solutions. I propose small scale solutions with survey data archives for individual institutes, projects or researchers that not only support comprehensive documentation but also raise awareness on survey-based projects’ complexity and the resulting high demands for information. The proposed small scale solutions must adhere to common standards and need to be attractive for the user in order to motivate application. Attractiveness increases with elements like master-detail interfaces and tree-views that provide the user with immediate overviews and by a structure that allows for simultaneous work-flow organization and meta-data entry. The meta-database SuPER is described as a paradigmatic example of how a database could reflect the complexity of a survey data-based research project.

URN: http://ift.tt/1tR9QCG

Anne Margarian http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

In many organizations, and among many researchers, there is considerable resistance to the systematic large scale storage of survey data. Thereby, not only data storage but also work-flow organization and documentation are often left to the individual researcher. Such practice leads to inefficiencies due to a lack of positive specialization effects and to problems in traceability due to the existence of small-scale ad hoc solutions. I propose small scale solutions with survey data archives for individual institutes, projects or researchers that not only support comprehensive documentation but also raise awareness on survey-based projects’ complexity and the resulting high demands for information. The proposed small scale solutions must adhere to common standards and need to be attractive for the user in order to motivate application. Attractiveness increases with elements like master-detail interfaces and tree-views that provide the user with immediate overviews and by a structure that allows for simultaneous work-flow organization and meta-data entry. The meta-database SuPER is described as a paradigmatic example of how a database could reflect the complexity of a survey data-based research project.

URN: http://ift.tt/1tR9QCG

— One Bird in the Hand …: The Local Organization of Surveys and Qualitative Data http://ift.tt/1qJ0bxB Anne Margarian Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research
“#OralHistory Internship Opportunity with the Apollo Theater Education Program: Deadline is September 17, 2014”

The Apollo Theater Education Program is looking for COLLEGE LEVEL interns to assist with this upcoming school year’s Oral History Project. For instructions on how to apply, visit our website. http://bit.ly/1zFELm3


Application: https://apolloeducation.org/docs/Video%20Oral%20History%20Internship%202014-15%20(2).pdf


Accepting resumes and cover letters until September 17, 2014

————-

A Bit of Background Info:PARTNER SCHOOL HIGHLIGHTS

The Apollo Theater Oral History Project, OHP, grew out of a larger initiative undertaken in 2006 to capture the oral histories of Apollo “history-makers” and others pertinent to the development of the Theater over the course of its more than 70 year history. During that same time, the Apollo’s Education Program launched a project at C.S. 154, The Harriet Tubman Learning Center, to teach 4th and 5th graders how to conduct oral history interviews of elders from the Harlem community. In 2010, the OHP expanded to Wadleigh Secondary School for Performing & Visual Arts. At Wadleigh, 11th graders learn to document oral history interviews using video. A cornerstone of the OHP is the connection between oral history, the humanities, and the arts, all of which are addressed in the curriculum.

C.S. 154 THE HARRIET TUBMAN LEARNING CENTER 

The Apollo Theater Oral History Project at C.S. 154 teaches fourth and fifth grade students how to conduct oral history interviews and use collected information as content to create theatrical vignettes. The Project integrates the history of Harlem, Black culture and the Apollo Theater into the school’s Social Studies, ELA and Arts curricula. A focus of the Project is the development of intergenerational relationships between C.S. 154 students and elders from the Harlem community.

Partnership Goals

Develop and increase students’ knowledge of the correlations between Harlem’s history, Black history, and the history of the Apollo Theater.

Develop students’ appreciation of the impact of Black Americans on the history and culture of New York City.

Provide students with a perspective of 20th century history through the living lens of those who experienced it first-hand.

Engage students in the process of gathering and recording information and then using it as content to create art. 

Provide classroom teachers with lesson plans and resources for incorporating oral history into the overall school curricula.

Read Harlem Pride A Tribute to Harlem, the Apollo Theater, and the Significant Elders of Harlem performed by the 2012 4th Grade students at C.S. 154 The Harriet Tubman Learning Center.

Listen to “A Picture of Happiness” produced by Julia Taylor for the 2011 5th Grade Oral History Project at C.S. 154 The Harriet Tubman Learning Center.

 —————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————-

OPPORTUNITIES:

COLLEGE LEVEL INTERNS WANTED FOR ORAL HISTORY PROJECT AT C.S. 154 FOR THE 2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR 

For instructions on how to apply click here

Accepting resumes and cover letters until September 17, 2014

WADLEIGH SECONDARY SCHOOL FOR THE PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS 

At Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing & Visual Arts, 11th graders learn to document oral history interviews using video. Wadleigh students learn aspects of video production, applying foundational filmmaking tools and theory while recording personal accounts of historical events from a variety of interviewees. Over the course of conducting the interviews, students learn how to have productive conversations and how to research and gather information. Through this process, they are able to connect the past to the present while considering their own impact on the future of their community.

Partnership Goals 

Provide students with foundational documentary filmmaking concepts, tools, and vocabulary.

Expand students’ knowledge of the history of Harlem and the cultural history of African-Americans and Latinos. 

Engage students in the process of gathering and researching information to support ideas and perspectives explored in their interviews. 

Students explore and learn filmmaking techniques to produce documentaries. 

Students engage in researching specific topics that correlate to their study of African American and Latino cultures and the history of Harlem.

Watch When Injustice Speaks a documentary video project featuring oral histories collected and filmed by students participating in the 2014 Apollo Theater Oral History Project at Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing and Visual Arts.

COLLEGE LEVEL INTERNS WANTED FOR VIDEO ORAL HISTORY PROJECT AT WADLEIGH SECONDARY SCHOOL OF PERFORMING AND VISUAL ARTS FOR THE 2014-2015 SCHOOL YEAR 

For instructions on how to apply click here

Accepting resumes and cover letters until September 17, 2014

Classic First Lines of Novels in Emojis: A Quiz

yeahwriters:

image

Answers are here. I only got 4!

Well this was an #emojifail for me. Still learning the language I guess. 

“Links Roundup #22 

saddle and ropeApps for Academics

Crystal pointed me to the site Smallwow Best Apps for Academics.  Created by Nicole Hennig, it is a companion for the 2014 book Best Apps for Academics by Hennig and Pam Nicholas.  Smallwow gets a big wow – excellently organized LibGuide with pages for apps for productivity, reading, library research, taking notes, writing, collaborating, presenting, and a page for resources.  It is pretty iOS-centric, one of the few downsides from my Android point of view, but iPads are very popular.

Catherine Pope of The Digital Researcher blog has an article that points to a Chrome  and Firefox extension that opens up a LOT of functionality for handling your tabs, such as grouping tabs and making a web page of tabs that can be shared with others.

TabTimes has an article on Parallels, an app for iOS and Android that allows one to control a PC or Mac from a smartphone or tablet.  It requires a subscription, but the annual cost has come down to $20.

The American Association for School Librarians (AASL) puts out an annual list of the Best Websites for Teaching and Learning which features websites (often apps or software).  Their description:  “The 2013 Best Websites for Teaching and Learning foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration. They are free, Web-based sites that are user friendly and encourage a community of learners to explore and discover.”  The categories are Media Sharing, Digital Storytelling, Manage and Organize, Social Networking and CommunicationsContent Resources, and Curriculum Collaboration.   Looks like a useful set of tools.

Citation/Research Management

Colwiz is a research management tool that includes reference management, calendars, to-do lists/project management, PDF managment, collaboration options, and more.  They have just upgraded their reference and PDF options through a Chrome extension that allows you to, while on a journal website, identify references, make it and the PDF available for import, allow annotating PDFs while still on the web, then add the annotated PDFs into your Colwiz library which can be viewed on the web, in the desktop software, or with mobile apps.  The information on the updates was in an email, so I can’t offer a URL other than the top level site.

Catherine Pope of The Digital Researcher has added two posts on how to integrate Zotero with Scrivener, a writing software popular with academic researchers.  The first one is How to Use Zotero with Scrivener – Pt. 1, and the next one is (wait for it…) How to Use Zotero with Scrivener – Pt. 2.

Another useful post from Catherine Pope of The Digital Researcher is Adding Citations to Google Docs using Zotero and Paperpile. I had not heard of Paperpile before, and sounds to me like once having imported a Zotero library one can then use Paperpile to manage references.  Paperpile is a Chrome app, does have a small monthly subscription, and is in the process of adding features, of which it already has an impressive number.

Cloud Storage

Jason Heppler’s recent Profhacker post Use Copy for Cloud Storage Backup and File Sharing discusses Copy, a product similar to Dropbox but with a better pricing structure (including 15 GB free).

The storage wars continue, as the CNET article Microsoft OneDrive Jumps to 15 MB Free details.  This makes it equal to Google Drive.

Evernote/OneNote/Notebook Software

Jamie Todd Rubin, Evernote’s Going Paperless Ambassador, generally writes clear well-organized columns about using Evernote.  In a recent post he describes how his use of Evernote has evolved over his years of using it, and it is interesting to see how a workflow of a busy professional has evolved.

Microsoft OneNote has added a feature in which you can email your OneNote account and put a URL in the subject or message body and it will send a screenshot of that web page into your default notebook.  It is nice, but doesn’t quite have the functionality of Evernote’s Web Clipper.

Catherine Pope continues to have really terrific posts on technologies of use to academic researchers in her blog The Digital Researcher.  Try out this post How to Annotate Images in Evernote.

Melanie Pinola on Lifehacker Australia has a post Send Your Kindle Book Notes and Highlighted Passages to Evernote.  Since Evernote searches the contents of all your notes, this could be a really useful.

A Microsoft OneNote developer has created an add-on called Onetastic that adds some cool options, such as various ways of sorting, adding a calendar or table of contents to a note, and more. The video included in the article is short but informative.  The site for the add-on is here.

IFTTT

Alex Campbell on PCWorld has a useful article on using Feed Rinse to set up RSS feeds and add filters to them to get only the the information you want, and then use IFTTT to send the feeds as SMS texts.  You could, of course, change that to your email or however else you want to see them.

 Mind Mapping

Jacob O’Gara has a nice roundup of the 15 best mind mapping tools on the Digital Trends website.  It has a nice mix of paid, free, and freemium; various operating systems, web based, and apps; lists some features of each and includes screenshots.

Operating Systems

Eric Ligman, a manager at Microsoft, has a post offering 300 or so free ebooks on Microsoft products, including various version of Windows, Office 365, Sharepoint, Moodle-Office 365 Plugin, the various Office products, lots of keyboard shortcuts for various products, various guides for developers and system administrators, and more.

Lifehacker does an annual roundup of their favorite essential applications for different platforms.  For example, Lifehacker Pack for Windows: Our List of the Essential Windows Apps, has apps in many categories, including Productivity, Internet and Communication, Utilities, and more.  The one for Macs is also available, as is the one for Android, Android tablets, Chrome, Firefox, as well as the one for iPhone, the iPad, and the Linux one.

Presentations

Found Slides through the Scout Report.  It looks like a great option for creating presentation slides.  It is in the cloud, syncs to a variety of devices, has a lot of customization options, and its free version allows 250 Mb of storage for publicly available slide decks.  Let us know in the comments if you have used it and your experiences with it.

Productivity Techniques

Alan Henry‘s post on Lifehacker Productivity 101: A Primer to the Pomodoro Technique is an excellent introduction to Francesco Cirillo‘s popular tomato-based productivity tool.  It discusses what Pomodoro is, the steps for getting started, apps that help you work with Pomodoro, who it works best for, integrating it with other productivity techniques, and additional reading.

To-do Lists

Alan Henry‘s Lifehacker post Make a 1-3-5 List for a Faster, Instantly-Prioritized To-Do List advocates having a daily to-do list of one big thing to get done that day, three medium-priority tasks you’d like to do, and five items it would be nice to do.

Writing

John Mello’s recent post in ComputerWorld  Review: 3 Note-Taking Gadgets Keep You Scribbling discusses that some studies show handwriting notes improve recall over typing them.  It then reviews Boogie Board, Adonit Jotscript Evernote Edition stylus, and the Livescribe 3 pen.

The post Links Roundup #22 appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.

http://ift.tt/1gY0T7Q
— Links Roundup #22 http://ift.tt/1mHFSvB Mary
Understanding Media Studies Monday Night Lecture Series http://ift.tt/1soMX7H Shannon

Understanding Media adOne of my fall courses is our MA program’s “Understanding Media Studies” lecture course, which I’ve taught three times before, in the past, when it was conceived as an “intro to grad studies” course. The class has been reorganized for this year, with some of the practical content extracted and repositioned in an intensive pre-semester Orientation, some of the study-skills- and professionalization-oriented content transformed into a set of online guides (which I created over the summer); and the Monday night meetings reconceived as a series of guest lectures and panel discussions with alums and advanced current students. Here’s my new course description:

Understanding Media Studies is a required course for all first-semester Media Studies MA students. It consists of a week-long orientation prior to the start of the semester, and a weekly seminar series that runs over the course of the semester. The orientation week introduces MA students to the Media Studies Faculty and Staff, to The New School’s facilities and resources, and to the fundamentals of procedural literacy and building a digital portfolio for your media studies career. The School of Media Studies Monday Night Lecture Series functions not only as a communal orientation experience for the first-semester UMS cohort, but also as an intellectual and creative “hub” for the entire School. We welcome several guest presenters from the academy, industry, and a variety of creative fields that represent the breadth of what Media Studies is and can be. We also welcome several New School Media Studies alumni and advanced current students, who speak with us about issues regarding professionalization and socialization within the field. UMS students are organized into small groups that are responsible for researching the various guests and preparing questions to kick off the Q&A period following each lecture; and for creating a recap and response post that is published on the School of Media Studies’ on-line magazine. The course is offered in a hybrid on-site/on-line format to accommodate all first-semester students.

And here’s our line-up for the semester:

AUGUST 25: Semester Plan + Student Involvement

SEPTEMBER 1: No Class: Labor Day

SEPTEMBER 8: Orientation to Research Resources + Visits w/ Representatives from the Libraries and University Learning Center

SEPTEMBER 15: Mary Flanagan, Artist, Writer, Game Designer + Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities @ Dartmouth College: “Changing the World Through Values at Play

All games express and embody human values, providing a compelling arena in which we play out beliefs and ideas. “Big ideas” such as justice, equity, honesty, and cooperation—as well as other kinds of ideas, including violence, exploitation, and greed—may emerge in games whether designers intend them or not. In this talk, Mary Flanagan presents Values at Play, a theoretical and practical framework for identifying socially recognized moral and political values in digital games. After developing a theoretical foundation for this approach, Flanagan will provide detailed examinations of selected games, demonstrating the many ways in which values are embedded in them. Flanagan will also discuss the Values at Play heuristic, a systematic approach for incorporating values into the game design process. Can better games enable a robust self and society?

Mary Flanagan has achieved international acclaim for novel interdisciplinary work that weaves a studio art practice into humanities scholarship and scientific inquiry. Not content to work solely in the gallery space, she invades commercial game design, pop culture, and academia with provocative ideas about authorship, politics, and aesthetics. Her artwork ranges from game based systems to computer viruses, embodied interfaces to interactive poems. These works are exhibited internationally at galleries including the Tate Britain, the Telfair Museum, and ZKM Germany. Flanagan’s hybrid practice was recently showcased in The Atlantic,and her engagement as a “public intellectual” pushed her to publish recent pieces in USA TodayThe Huffington PostThe San Francisco ChronicleInside Higher Education, and more. Flanagan has served on the faculty of the Salzburg Global Seminar & the White House Office of Science & Technology Policy Academic Consortium on Games for Impact. She holds the honorary title at Dartmouth College of the Sherman Fairchild Distinguished Professor in Digital Humanities.  Her most recent book, co-authored with Helen Nissenbaum, is Values at Play in Digital Games (2014) with MIT Press.

SEPTEMBER 22: Discussion of Methods + Creative Methods Panel

  • Deepthi Welaratna, Media Studies ‘10; Social Systems Designer; Founder of Thicket: A Laboratory for Creative Problem Solvers
  • Ben Mendelsohn, Media Studies ‘11; Ph.D. Student in Media, Culture and Communication at NYU
  • Laura Scherling, Media Studies ‘14; Doctoral Student @ Teachers College, Columbia University; Designer, The New School
  • Brian Bulfer, Doctoral Student @ Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Adrian Hopkins, Media Studies ‘11; Director of Strategy @ Bureau Blank

SEPTEMBER 29: Student/Alumni Panel re: “Publicizing Your Work”

  • Participants TBA

OCTOBER 6: Caitlin Burns, Transmedia Producer: “Lessons from the Story Business

We’re no longer working in the Film Industry, the TV Industry or the Video Game Industry, the world of entertainment has comailnverged and there is one clear through line: story. As a Transmedia Producer, Caitlin Burns has spent a decade producing intellectual properties whose stories flow across platforms. Each experience type faces unique challenges to production and together thrilling new opportunities emerge as technology and creativity combine. These are some lessons for projects large and small drawn from Studio Projects and Console Games, Digital Experiences and Live Theatre. There have never been more opportunities to reach audiences with narrative work… What does a success story look like?

Caitlin Burns is a Transmedia Producer and Content Strategist based in New York City.  She is an elected member of the Producer’s Guild of America’s New Media Council Board of Delegates and is a Co-Chair of the PGA Women’s Impact Network. Her work includes narrative and multiplatform strategies for notables such as: Pirates of the Caribbean,Fairies, and Tron Legacy for Disney, James Cameron’s Avatar for 20th Century Fox, Halo for Microsoft, Happiness Factory for The Coca-Cola Company, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for Nickelodeon and Transformers for Hasbro. She has also worked with Sony, Showtime, Pepperidge Farm, Scholastic, Tribeca New Media Fund, FEMSA, Wieden+Kennedy, Reebok and Stratasys. Her independent production, McCarren Park, launched at the Tribeca Film Institute Interactive Day and screened at the New York Film Festival: Convergence.

OCTOBER 13: Susa Pop, Managing Director, Public Art Lab, Berlin: “Urban Screens as Community Platforms

Susa Pop is an urban media curator and producer based in Berlin. In 2003 she founded Public Art Lab (PAL) as a network of experts from the fields of urban planning, new media arts and IT. Susa Pop is interested in creative city-making through urban media art projects that catalyze communication processes in the public space. She initiated most of the PAL projects like the Connecting Cities Network (2012-16), Media Facades Festivals Berlin 2008 and Europe 2010, Mobile Studios (2006) and Mobile Museums (2004). She also speaks worldwide at conferences and workshops and is a lecturer at several universities like University of Potsdam and Leuphana University /  Institute of Urban and Cultural Area Research. In 2012 Susa Pop co-edited and published the book Urban Media Cultures.

OCTOBER 20: Mary Wareham and Jody Williams, with Peter Asaro: “Media Advocacy for Humanitarian Disarmament: From Landmines to Killer Robots

Chaired by Dr. Peter Asaro, this panel discussion by Nobel Peace Laureate Ms. Jody Williams and Mary Wareham of Human Rights Watch will look at the evolving nature of media outreach and advocacy for humanitarian disarmament. Williams and Wareham have collaborated together over the past twenty years on initiatives to ban antipersonnel landmines and cluster munitions. They are co-founders of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots (http://ift.tt/17ROHLq), a global coalition of non-governmental organizations that is seeking a preemptive ban on weapons that would select and attack targets without meaningful human control. The panelists will consider how media has reacted to and covered the challenges posed by autonomous weapons and call for a ban as well as the similarities and differences to media outreach and advocacy for campaigning against landmines and cluster munitions. They will discuss how the Internet and social media have changed the landscape, and also how new media has changed the campaign’s approaches to mainstream media and journalists.

Jody Williams, Nobel Peace Laureate

@JodyWilliams97@NobelWomen @StopRapeCmpgn

The Nobel Women’s Initiative is a co-founder of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots and Jody Williams serves as a spokesperson for the global coalition.

In 1997, Jody Williams became the tenth woman to receive the Nobel Peace Prize for her role as the founding coordinator (1991-1998) of the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL), co-recipient of the Peace Prize. Jody served as a chief strategist and spokesperson for the campaign in the crucial “Ottawa Process” period that saw an unprecedented diplomatic effort involving governments as well as NGOs, UN agencies, and the International Committee of the Red Cross work to adopt the Mine Ban Treaty in record time.

Williams established the Nobel Women’s Initiative in 2006 together with five of her sister Nobel Peace laureates to work for a democratic world free of violence against women and all of humanity. In 2012, the Nobel Women’s Initiative and other NGOs formed the International Campaign to Stop Rape & Gender Violence in Conflict.

Mary Wareham, Human Rights Watch arms division advocacy director

@marywareham @hrw @bankillerrobots

Human Rights Watch is a co-founder of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots and Mary Wareham serves as the coalition’s global coordinator.

Mary Wareham is advocacy director of the Arms Division, where she leads Human Rights Watch’s advocacy against particularly problematic weapons that pose a significant threat to civilians. She was centrally involved in the efforts to secure the 2008 Convention on Cluster Munitions and 1997 Mine Ban Treaty. On behalf of Human Rights Watch, Wareham was responsible for helping to establish and coordinate the Landmine Monitor research initiative by the International Campaign to Ban Landmines, which verifies compliance and implementation of the 1997 Mine Ban Treaty.

Wareham directed and produced an award-winning feature-length documentary film on landmines entitled “Disarm” (2006). She worked as a researcher for the New Zealand parliament from 1995 to 1996 after receiving bachelor’s and master’s degrees in political science from Victoria University of Wellington.

OCTOBER 27: Benjamen Walker, Host, Public Radio Exchange’s “Theory of Everything”: TITLE TBA

Benjamen Walker has made radio for NPR, WNYC, WFMU, and the BBC. Currently he produces and hosts The Theory of Everything, part of the Radiotopia network from the public radio exchange.

NOVEMBER 3: Jill Godmilow, Independent Filmmaker, Emeritus Faculty @ University of Notre Dame: “Staying Out of the Torture Room: The Post-Realist Documentary

Since 1966 Jill Godmilow has been producing and directing non-fiction and narrative films including the Academy Award nominated Antonia: A Portrait Of The Woman (1974); Far from Poland, (1984) the post-realist documentary feature about the rise of the Polish Solidarity movement; Waiting for the Moon (1987), a feminist/modernist fictional feature about the lives of the literary couple Alice B. Toklas and Gertrude Stein (1st prize, Sundance Film Festival); Roy Cohn/Jack Smith (1995), a cinematic translation of a theater piece by performance artist Ron Vawter; What Farocki Taught, a replica and interrogation of a short film by German filmmaker Harun Farocki about the production of Napalm B during the Vietnam war, and most recently, a 6 hour, DVD archive, Lear ’87 Archive (Condensed) about the work of the renown New York City theatrical collective, Mabou Mines, at work  on a fully gender-reversed production of Shakespeare’s “King Lear”. Among others, she has received fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations. In 2003, Antonia: A Portrait of The Woman was added to the prestigious National Film Registry at the Library of Congress.

NOVEMBER 10: Andrew Uroskie, Associate Professor of Modern Art History and Criticism, SUNY Stony Brook: Selma Last Year (1966): Site-Specificity and the Origins of Expanded Cinema”

This talk will consider “Selma Last Year,” a largely forgotten multimedia installation that took place during the Winter of 1966 as part of the New York Film Festival’s fleeting interest in Expanded Cinema. A collaboration between the street theater producer Ken Dewey, Magnum photojournalist Bruce Davidson, and Minimalist composer Terry Riley, this groundbreaking media installation juxtaposed large scale projected images, an immersive audio collage, small scale photographic prints, 16mm documentary film, and a delayed video feedback loop to create a series of intentionally disjunctive environments. During the Festival’s Expanded Cinema Symposium, Annette Michelson would explicitly dismiss Dewey’s work as a “revival of the old dream of synesthesia”— insisting upon a Modernist conception of medium-specificity as the only legitimate grounds for aesthetic radicalism. While the success of the “Structural Film” in the years immediately following might be taken as evidence for Michelson’s position, I contend that Dewey’s prescient concern for what would come to be known as “site-specificity” would prove the more enduring model for critical media aesthetics in the decades to come.

Andrew V. Uroskie is Associate Professor of Modern & Contemporary Art, and Director of the Doctoral Program in Modern Art History, Criticism and Theory at Stony Brook University in New York. Broadly speaking, his work explores how durational media have helped to reframe traditional models of aesthetic production, exhibition, spectatorship, and objecthood. He has published in numerous journals and anthologies in the US, England, Italy, Spain, and Brazil, both in English and in translation. His first book, “Between the Black Box and the White Cube: Expanded Cinema and Postwar Art,” was recently published by the University of Chicago Press.

NOVEMBER 17: Student/Alumni Panel “Career Trajectories,” co-sponsored by Career Success Link

  • Participants TBA 

NOVEMBER 24: No Class – Thanksgiving Week

DECEMBER 1 (World AIDS Day): Anne Balsamo, Dean, School of Media Studies: “Digital Experiences for the AIDS Memorial Quilt”

Blurb to come

http://ift.tt/1qgDoZZ
“The “Untold” Stories of Outsiders and Their Significance for the Analysis of (Post-) Conflict Figurations

We have conducted interviews with women and men who are victims of collective violence in the region of West Nile in northern Uganda, by the hands either of rebels or of members of various government armies. We show the position and relevancy of their perspectives in public discourses in and about this region. Using biographical-narrative interviews and group discussions, we highlight how their voices are subdued in public discourse in which the ex-rebels present themselves as the victims of history. The interviews illustrate that the narrative interview method is of help also in this non-European research setting as it supports the interviewees to verbalize what they have suffered. The analysis of how collective violence is thematized in the interviews as well as in public discourses brings about important insights into the perspectivity and the biases of these discourses—and how they were generated. For this reason (amongst others), it is important, when analyzing the region’s recent history as well as (post-) conflict figurations in general to accommodate the biographical experiences of victims of collective violence.

URN: http://ift.tt/1vv6YLQ

Artur Bogner, Gabriele Rosenthal http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

We have conducted interviews with women and men who are victims of collective violence in the region of West Nile in northern Uganda, by the hands either of rebels or of members of various government armies. We show the position and relevancy of their perspectives in public discourses in and about this region. Using biographical-narrative interviews and group discussions, we highlight how their voices are subdued in public discourse in which the ex-rebels present themselves as the victims of history. The interviews illustrate that the narrative interview method is of help also in this non-European research setting as it supports the interviewees to verbalize what they have suffered. The analysis of how collective violence is thematized in the interviews as well as in public discourses brings about important insights into the perspectivity and the biases of these discourses—and how they were generated. For this reason (amongst others), it is important, when analyzing the region’s recent history as well as (post-) conflict figurations in general to accommodate the biographical experiences of victims of collective violence.

URN: http://ift.tt/1vv6YLQ

— The “Untold” Stories of Outsiders and Their Significance for the Analysis of (Post-) Conflict Figurations http://ift.tt/1vv6YLS Artur Bogner, Gabriele Rosenthal Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research
“Questioning the Rule-Making Imperative in Therapeutic Stabilizations of Non-Monogamous (Open) Relationships

Given increasing social scientific and public interest in open relationships, attending to therapeutic engagements with such a lifestyle choice is of topical concern. Specifically, the rule-making imperative for the creation and stabilization of open non-monogamies involves the widely embraced principle in counseling and self-help literature that a “couple’s” rules for their non-monogamous engagements are crucial for personal and relational well-being. Data presented in this article stem from semi-structured interviews with seventeen UK counselors/psychotherapists who identified their therapeutic engagements with consensual non-monogamies (primarily in gay male open relationships) as being “affirmative” in some way. A Foucauldian-inflected thematic analysis highlighted patterns of meaning in relation to: perceived non-monogamous disorder; clinical recognitions of the inevitability of disorder; and ways in which assumed non-monogamous disorder, and thus the warrant for rule-making, can be reinforced in psychological terms. Drawing on the notion of “bifurcation” put forward in chaos theory, it is argued that to enlist the imperative of rule-making as a precautionary or remedial strategy is to overlook the more productive aspects of chaotic turbulence in open relationships and thus undermine alternative recognitions of relational health and well-being.

URN: http://ift.tt/1tkRD01

Mark David Finn http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

Given increasing social scientific and public interest in open relationships, attending to therapeutic engagements with such a lifestyle choice is of topical concern. Specifically, the rule-making imperative for the creation and stabilization of open non-monogamies involves the widely embraced principle in counseling and self-help literature that a “couple’s” rules for their non-monogamous engagements are crucial for personal and relational well-being. Data presented in this article stem from semi-structured interviews with seventeen UK counselors/psychotherapists who identified their therapeutic engagements with consensual non-monogamies (primarily in gay male open relationships) as being “affirmative” in some way. A Foucauldian-inflected thematic analysis highlighted patterns of meaning in relation to: perceived non-monogamous disorder; clinical recognitions of the inevitability of disorder; and ways in which assumed non-monogamous disorder, and thus the warrant for rule-making, can be reinforced in psychological terms. Drawing on the notion of “bifurcation” put forward in chaos theory, it is argued that to enlist the imperative of rule-making as a precautionary or remedial strategy is to overlook the more productive aspects of chaotic turbulence in open relationships and thus undermine alternative recognitions of relational health and well-being.

URN: http://ift.tt/1tkRD01

— Questioning the Rule-Making Imperative in Therapeutic Stabilizations of Non-Monogamous (Open) Relationships http://ift.tt/1w82cYX Mark David Finn Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research
“Tracking and Surveillance News of the Week: Google Maps Has Been Tracking Your Every Move, And There’s A Website To Prove It”

map2

Remember that scene in Minority Report, where Tom Cruise is on the run from the law, but is unable to avoid detection because everywhere he goes there are constant retina scans feeding his location back to a central database? That’s tomorrow. Today, Google is tracking wherever your smartphone goes, and putting a neat red dot on a map to mark the occasion.

You can find that map here. All you need to do is log in with the same account you use on your phone, and the record of everywhere you’ve been for the last day to month will erupt across your screen like chicken pox.

googlemap

We all know that no matter what ‘privacy’ settings you may try and implement, our information is all being collected and stored somewhere. That knowledge sits in the back of our minds, and is easy to drown out by shoving in some headphones and watching Adventure Time on repeat until everything stops being 1984.  But it’s a sharp jolt back to reality when you see a two dimensional image marking your daily commute with occasional detours to the cinema or a friend’s house.

Looking at mine, I realised that a) I live my life in a very small radius, and b) there are places on my map that I don’t remember going. One of them I’ve apparently visited three times on different days. Once whilst “Biking” and twice while “Stationary”. All at times I wouldn’t usually be awake. I’m not sure what’s happening on Wood Street in North Melbourne, or why my phone apparently travels there without me, but I’m not going to rule out secret alien conspiracies.

This never happened. UNLESS IT DID.

This never happened. UNLESS IT DID.

Apparently this record only happens if you have ‘location services’ switched on in your phone; if you do and you’re finding you have no data, then it means that either you don’t exist or you’ve beaten the system. If it’s the latter, please teach me your ways; I know for a fact that I switched my phone’s location detection off, but apparently it somehow got switched back on.

-

Get creeped out by logging in here.

Disable it by reading this: https://www.yahoo.com/tech/how-to-stop-google-maps-from-remembering-everywhere-you-87005789389.html

“Talking About Drug Use: Positioning and Reflexivity in Drug Research Interviews and Beyond

The recognition of the role of discourse in the production of self-understandings and subjectivity has undergone considerable theoretical development over the past decades. Yet, attention to possible ramifications for the status of conversation-based research has been limited and parochial.

This article examines the research interview, as a methodological technique and as a social and cultural event, in relation to representations of drug use, agency and responsibility, arguing that research conversations about drugs cannot be understood in separation from the cultural repertoire of speaking positions evoked by the particular topic of inquiry. In the context of drug research, such positions are embedded in circulating narratives of drug use and drug users, as well as in generalized images of responsibility, self-sufficiency, and the personal management of information and risk. Drawing on material from an ethnographic study of recreational substance use among young adults in Norway, it is suggested that such conversations are unique occasions for the deployment of and reflection on subject positions, giving rise to functions of the research interview beyond the generation of sociological data.

URN: http://ift.tt/1yDxoeo

Per Kristian Hilden http://ift.tt/eA8V8J

The recognition of the role of discourse in the production of self-understandings and subjectivity has undergone considerable theoretical development over the past decades. Yet, attention to possible ramifications for the status of conversation-based research has been limited and parochial.

This article examines the research interview, as a methodological technique and as a social and cultural event, in relation to representations of drug use, agency and responsibility, arguing that research conversations about drugs cannot be understood in separation from the cultural repertoire of speaking positions evoked by the particular topic of inquiry. In the context of drug research, such positions are embedded in circulating narratives of drug use and drug users, as well as in generalized images of responsibility, self-sufficiency, and the personal management of information and risk. Drawing on material from an ethnographic study of recreational substance use among young adults in Norway, it is suggested that such conversations are unique occasions for the deployment of and reflection on subject positions, giving rise to functions of the research interview beyond the generation of sociological data.

URN: http://ift.tt/1yDxoeo

— Talking About Drug Use: Positioning and Reflexivity in Drug Research Interviews and Beyond http://ift.tt/1l8bIqh Per Kristian Hilden Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research
“Academic PKM Interview Fun!
Bonnie Stachowiak

Bonni Stachowiak

Crystal and I were interviewed last week by Bonni Stachowiak for her Teaching in Higher Ed blog and podcast.  We all had a lot of fun together, and we hope that you might get some ideas about PKM and how it applies to higher education by listening to it.  It is about thirty minutes long.  And please do spend time looking at Bonni’s blog – she does excellent work!

The post Academic PKM Interview Fun! appeared first on Personal Knowledge Management for Academia & Librarians.

http://ift.tt/1owTIWY
— Academic PKM Interview Fun! http://ift.tt/1owTHCt Mary
Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure and Aesthetics: 9/19 – 21 http://ift.tt/1mJbPDv Shannon 
I’m very excited to share the press release for the upcoming symposium and lecture series “Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure, and Aesthetics.” I’ve been delighted to serve on the planning committee alongside some fantastic colleagues and students from NYU and SUNY Stony Brook. Please come!
.
LINES AND NODES: MEDIA, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND AESTHETICS
This symposium and screening series will bring together artists and scholars to examine the mediated and aesthetic dimensions of extraction and infrastructure. In the last decade, we have seen an explosion of artistic and scholarly interest in resource extraction, its cultural geographies, and the infrastructures that support it. We convene this event to interrogate the relationships between the representations of such dynamics and the larger forces that they condense: globalization, transmission, digitization, territorialization, labor migration, displacement, sustainability, security.
We aim to facilitate an idea-exchange between scholars and media artists whose practices critically assess the function, meaning and representation of lines, nodes and grids that undergird the energy, resource and information-dependent global economy, from oil pipelines to mining pits, and from undersea fiber optic cables to digital archives. What are the juridical, economic, bio-political and aesthetic dimensions of this accelerating age of extraction and consumption? How are these connections materialized in mediated works?
Scholars from a range of disciplines are invited, including: Media Studies, Architecture and Design and Geography. We also solicit media makers whose work operates in documentary, experimental and art contexts. The symposium’s keynote presenter will be Swiss filmmaker/researcher Ursula Biemann, who has for the past twenty years produced a respected body of essay films that interrogate global relations under the impact of the accelerated mobility of people, resources and information.
Find the full symposium schedule here.
SCREENING SERIES
From Friday, September 19, through Sunday, September 21, Anthology Film Archives presents Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure, and Aesthetics, a 17-film series exploring how contemporary filmmakers and artists are examining the diverse human-made infrastructures that shape almost every aspect of modern life, including: fiber optic systems, CCTV networks, petroleum corridors, border security zones and public transport.
With films from eight countries, the series makes adventurous propositions regarding the contemporary global economy, how the Earth’s human era – the anthropocene – has transformed the planet and how filmmakers and artists are making sense of the larger forces involved: security, digitalization, migration and labor. Lines and Nodes is curated by: Chi-hui Yang, Brooke Belisle, Leo Goldsmith, Ben Mendelsohn, Sukhdev Sandhu, Nicole Starosielski.
The series offers a collection of documentary, essay, animation and experimental films and videos, created from the 1950s to present. D.A. Pennebaker’s classic short film Daybreak Express (1953) follows the path of New York City’s now-defunct Third Avenue elevated subway train. Bernardo Bertolucci’s commissioned documentary The Path of Oil (1964)—rarely-screened and recently restored—traces the route of crude oil as it is shipped from Iran to Europe. The Land of Wandering Souls (1999), by Oscar- nominated filmmaker Rithy Panh (The Missing Picture), exposes the back-breaking labor involved in laying Cambodia’s first fiber optic lines. Each of these films suggests news ways of examining patterns of global exchange in one’s own surroundings.
Opening Lines and Nodes is an evening with Swiss essay filmmaker Ursula Biemann, who for the past twenty years has interrogated global relations amid the accelerated mobility of people, resources and information. Through meticulous studies of oil geographies, irregular human migration zones and regions of environmental crisis, Biemann offers a powerful cinematic template for investigating the unpleasant challenges of 21st century capitalism. Biemann will present four films, including her latest, FOREST LAW, an inquiry into the Ecuadorian Amazon, and the legal status of the tropical forest itself and its relationship to indigenous communities.
Three thematic programs of short films — “Lines,” “Circulations,” and “Water” — also feature works by Len Lye, Pat O’Neill, Peter Bo Rappmund, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, CAMP, Adam Diller, Sarah Christman, Ralph Keene, Hunter Snyder, and Bouchra Khalili.
Find the full screening schedule here, or on Anthology’s website.
Lines and Nodes is presented in conjunction with a one-day symposium hosted by NYU’s Department of Media, Culture and Communications, which will, on September 19, convene artists and scholars to examine the mediated and aesthetic dimensions of extraction and infrastructure. The seriesis supported in part by grants from the New York University Arts Council, NYU Department of English, the Asian/Pacific/AmericanInstitute at NYU, NYU Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, and NYU Metropolitan Studies Program with additional support from the NYU Department of Media, Culture and Communications.
Tickets for film screening series are available for purchase at Anthology Film Archives.http://ift.tt/sAZUi9
Review copies of many films are available – please contact Chi-hui Yang: chihui.yang@gmail.com

 http://ift.tt/1cGDC8k
Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure and Aesthetics: 9/19 – 21 http://ift.tt/1mJbPDv Shannon

harel-korem_layout

I’m very excited to share the press release for the upcoming symposium and lecture series “Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure, and Aesthetics.” I’ve been delighted to serve on the planning committee alongside some fantastic colleagues and students from NYU and SUNY Stony Brook. Please come!

.

LINES AND NODES: MEDIA, INFRASTRUCTURE, AND AESTHETICS

This symposium and screening series will bring together artists and scholars to examine the mediated and aesthetic dimensions of extraction and infrastructure. In the last decade, we have seen an explosion of artistic and scholarly interest in resource extraction, its cultural geographies, and the infrastructures that support it. We convene this event to interrogate the relationships between the representations of such dynamics and the larger forces that they condense: globalization, transmission, digitization, territorialization, labor migration, displacement, sustainability, security.

We aim to facilitate an idea-exchange between scholars and media artists whose practices critically assess the function, meaning and representation of lines, nodes and grids that undergird the energy, resource and information-dependent global economy, from oil pipelines to mining pits, and from undersea fiber optic cables to digital archives. What are the juridical, economic, bio-political and aesthetic dimensions of this accelerating age of extraction and consumption? How are these connections materialized in mediated works?

Scholars from a range of disciplines are invited, including: Media Studies, Architecture and Design and Geography. We also solicit media makers whose work operates in documentary, experimental and art contexts. The symposium’s keynote presenter will be Swiss filmmaker/researcher Ursula Biemann, who has for the past twenty years produced a respected body of essay films that interrogate global relations under the impact of the accelerated mobility of people, resources and information.

Find the full symposium schedule here.

SCREENING SERIES

From Friday, September 19, through Sunday, September 21, Anthology Film Archives presents Lines and Nodes: Media, Infrastructure, and Aesthetics, a 17-film series exploring how contemporary filmmakers and artists are examining the diverse human-made infrastructures that shape almost every aspect of modern life, including: fiber optic systems, CCTV networks, petroleum corridors, border security zones and public transport.

With films from eight countries, the series makes adventurous propositions regarding the contemporary global economy, how the Earth’s human era – the anthropocene – has transformed the planet and how filmmakers and artists are making sense of the larger forces involved: security, digitalization, migration and labor. Lines and Nodes is curated by: Chi-hui Yang, Brooke Belisle, Leo Goldsmith, Ben Mendelsohn, Sukhdev Sandhu, Nicole Starosielski.

The series offers a collection of documentary, essay, animation and experimental films and videos, created from the 1950s to present. D.A. Pennebaker’s classic short film Daybreak Express (1953) follows the path of New York City’s now-defunct Third Avenue elevated subway train. Bernardo Bertolucci’s commissioned documentary The Path of Oil (1964)—rarely-screened and recently restored—traces the route of crude oil as it is shipped from Iran to Europe. The Land of Wandering Souls (1999), by Oscar- nominated filmmaker Rithy Panh (The Missing Picture), exposes the back-breaking labor involved in laying Cambodia’s first fiber optic lines. Each of these films suggests news ways of examining patterns of global exchange in one’s own surroundings.

Opening Lines and Nodes is an evening with Swiss essay filmmaker Ursula Biemann, who for the past twenty years has interrogated global relations amid the accelerated mobility of people, resources and information. Through meticulous studies of oil geographies, irregular human migration zones and regions of environmental crisis, Biemann offers a powerful cinematic template for investigating the unpleasant challenges of 21st century capitalism. Biemann will present four films, including her latest, FOREST LAW, an inquiry into the Ecuadorian Amazon, and the legal status of the tropical forest itself and its relationship to indigenous communities.

Three thematic programs of short films — “Lines,” “Circulations,” and “Water” — also feature works by Len Lye, Pat O’Neill, Peter Bo Rappmund, Mathieu Kleyebe Abonnenc, CAMP, Adam Diller, Sarah Christman, Ralph Keene, Hunter Snyder, and Bouchra Khalili.

Find the full screening schedule here, or on Anthology’s website.

Lines and Nodes is presented in conjunction with a one-day symposium hosted by NYU’s Department of Media, Culture and Communications, which will, on September 19, convene artists and scholars to examine the mediated and aesthetic dimensions of extraction and infrastructure. The seriesis supported in part by grants from the New York University Arts Council, NYU Department of English, the Asian/Pacific/AmericanInstitute at NYU, NYU Department of Social and Cultural Analysis, and NYU Metropolitan Studies Program with additional support from the NYU Department of Media, Culture and Communications.

Tickets for film screening series are available for purchase at Anthology Film Archives.http://ift.tt/sAZUi9

Review copies of many films are available – please contact Chi-hui Yang: chihui.yang@gmail.com

http://ift.tt/1cGDC8k

The Color Thesaurus

tangy-san:

moirakatson:

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

image

All from Ingrid’s Notes on Wordpress, direct link here.

thank the lord oh my

(via thatbooksmell)

“Evernote Casserole

Casserole Dish Sometimes in cooking one throws together a casserole dish from whatever is in the refrigerator.  So, now, I have thrown together a review of a number of smaller e-books I’ve gathered on Evernote when the cost was from free to $2.99 or so.  Some of them have been useful, some less so.  As usual with most collections of written material, almost all of them have some feature(s) that makes them valuable and some that aren’t so helpful.

Of course, there are reasons why ebooks are not the best choice for any software, especially ones that have versions for so many browsers, operating systems, and mobile apps.  Evernote in particular changes constantly, and not in an even pattern across versions.  A great new feature may appear first in the iPhone app, then cross over into the others.  So, since books are not updated often, it would seem a book is not a good choice for discussing software.  On the other hand, Evernote has a metric ton of features, and thus a book can be needed to give a more complete picture.

I have tried, therefore, to mention books that are recent (within the last couple of years, for the most part).  Given these considerations, here are the good, the bad, and the ugly.  Warning:  A lot of these are self-published, and the bibliographic information can be sketchy.

The Good

Evernote:  Wow!  I Didn’t Know It Could Do That. Author: G. Scaysbrook,  July, 2014, sold by Amazon Digital Services, and listed by them as 175 pages, but seems much shorter (Kindle books don’t show page numbers as such, but rather the percentage of the book read).

It offers a good selection of tips, decent writing, and easy-to-read graphics (I use the Kindle app on my Nook HD, which includes color, so not sure how well the screenshots on any of these books look on a black and white or paperwhite device).  Example tips that were well done including emailing notes to your Evernote account, including the syntax for doing so.  Also well done were searching notes and the extensive syntax Evernote has for searching.

I will highlight new tips and features; since I consider myself advanced in literacy about Evernote, I am assuming that things I don’t know are things the average user won’t know either.  So in this case, things I didn’t know included how to unmerge notes and how to create shortcuts to your computer’s folders and files.

Evernote for Windows: The Most Comprehensive Guidebook, by M. Yilmaz.  July 2013, 122 pages.

Table of Contents clearly labels which topics are about actions to take, with the rest being discussions, and features are ranked as basic, intermediate, or advanced level.  It is already out-of-date since it lacks any mention of reminders, for example.

Examples of good discussions include the benefits of synchronized and unsynchronized notebooks; search syntax; why notes are in only one notebook unless copied (similar to folder/file structure in your computer); advanced search syntax such as searching for attribute,  file type,  dates created,  etc.  This book, along with several others, mentions using special characters to place a note or tag at top of the list,  such as !Urgent. Good discussion of customizing the layout to create look that works best for you,  including the favorites toolbar.

Things I didn’t know: can create hierarchy of tags.   To do so,  drag one tag on top of another,  and dragged tag becomes child node. Also that notes deleted are not deleted immediately,  can go into trash and undelete them.

Master Evernote: The Unofficial Guide to Organizing Your Life with Evernote (Plus 75 Ideas to Get You Started).  by S.  J.  Scott, July 5, 2014.  Archangel Ink. 127 pages.

The author does a lot of self-published productivity books, and the Evernote Scott YouTube videos.

Does explicitly discuss GTD in the book. Includes a good discussion of adding notebooks and tags for a GTD system in Evernote,  including nested tags.

The 75 Ideas for getting started with Evernote section is variable in quality or application for a specific individual,  but a great idea for person who might be having trouble visualizing how they might use Evernote – and even habitual users might find some good new ideas.

For example,  #7 -  everything you speak to Siri or Google Now can be archived in Evernote.  There is a link to an IFTTT recipe for appending to a reminder note. Ideas #14 through 19 are for college students,  such as saving various documents such as syllabi,  creating notes for useful for specific classes,  creating a digital school filing cabinet  (perhaps a better idea to use it as a digital portfolio for college work).

Things I  didn’t know:  Did know that that in searching quote marks could be used for a phrase,  did not know one can use an asterisk as truncation symbol; besides creating shortcuts to folders and files,  you can,  in Windows,  set up a folder to import into Evernote (everything you add to that folder becomes an item in Evernote); with Skitch, besides doing some  markups of files, one can save the files as PDFs.

Master Getting Things Done the David Allen Way with Evernote.   By Dominic Wolff.   Organized Living Press.  August 2013 edition.   79 pages.

This book is designed to get you up and running with GTD using Evernote in 7 days.   Nicely set out to introduce both,  though not comprehensive on either,  and not meant to be.

The Bad

How to Use Evernote: The Unofficial Manual. by Mark O’Neil.   August 31, 2012, 61 pages.

This is one of the free MakeUseOf ebooks.   The layout is good. Includes very basic information,  but lots of visuals.

Things I hadn’t thought of or know – send favorite tweets to Evernote via IFTTT.  Mentions Evernote Trunk.

Ranked among the bad because the information is so basic, and because it was “published” in 2012 and therefore quite out of date.

Evernote: The Unofficial Guide to Capturing Everything and Getting Things Done.   by D.  E.  Gold.   2011.   69 pages.

Some use in organizing Evernote for accomplishing GTD.  Big idea is to have  master note with links to other notes (every note in Evernote has its own URL) for such things as planning travel,  meeting agendas, next actions,  and client notes.  Not as good as the Wolff book listed above.

65 Ways to Use Evernote to Supercharge Your Life.   By T.  McNally.   35 pages,  Amazon Digital Services.   Jan.  4, 2014.

Items 36-48 on education, most of which are applicable to college study.   Items 49-54 are about research,  also mostly applicable to college.   Most of the rest about personal life (travel, finance, etc), with the last few about Evernote features useful to anyone.  The fact that most of it is focused on personal life and so little on professional life is the only reason it is in the bad category, otherwise it is a nice little book.

The Ugly

Practical Guide to Evernote (Windows)  by Prof.  Jeffery Owens.  Fountainhead Publications,  June 2013.  40 pages.

Poor layout,  poor visuals.   Not a great deal new.

Does have interesting bit on sorting notes in chapter 7.  Usually reverse chronological order, but can order them by almost any attribute.  Includes an extensive and categorized list of keyboard shortcuts. Also how to use the Wine environment to install Evernote on Ubuntu (various consumer versions of Unix such as Linux and Ubuntu are the last operating systems on which Evernote does not work), and how to add a player to open audio files directly in Evernote.

Evernote Essentials Guide Boxed Set – includes Evernote: What You Should Learn or Know About Evernote by David Blaine,  and Evenote: How to Master Evernote in 1 Hour and Getting Things Done Without Forgetting by Jason Scotts.   Date for boxed set is June 2014, doesn’t mean the books are, and there are no dates on each book.  Both mention reminders,  so they must be fairly recent.  Moreover, the title may be meant to confuse this book with Brett Kelly’s often mentioned Evernote Essentials, written by a man who worked for a time for Evernote and knows it inside out (no, I haven’t read it, so it is not reviewed here – the copy I had was corrupted).

Blaine -  Bad organization,  mostly useless details few if any screenshots,  no bibliographic information (several of the books reviewed suffer from this).   Suddenly starts talking about a mind mapping software near the end without a segue.

Scotts -  p.  29 to 62.  Very basic intro to both Evernote and GTD, not particularly valuable or well laid out.

The Rest

I have also read two well-done, professionally published and book length books on Evernote, Evernote for Dummies (there is a 2014 edition which I don’t have) by David Sarna and My Evernote by Katherine Murray.  I recommend both of them, but the twin problems with them are price and currency.  The Murray book is excellently organized and laid out, and is a great book for beginners, while the Sarna book is also well done and includes more advanced features than Murray does.

Has this been a comprehensive review of all books published on Evernote?  No.  These are books that I have run across, acquired, and spent the time to look at.  Hopefully, though, they will give you an idea of how popular books on Evernote are, and a helpful guide to some that might be affordable AND useful.

 Works Mentioned

Again, the bibliographic information on these books is sketchy, so a professional quality citation is difficult.  I have tried to form something that vaguely resembles APA style.  ;-).

Blaine, D. and Scotts, J.  Evernote Essentials Guide (Boxed Set). Tech Tron, June 13, 2014, 68 pages.

Gold, D. E.  The Unofficial Guide to Capturing Everything and Getting Things Done, 2nd Edition. Publisher: Daniel E. Gold, 2011, 73 pages.

Mcnally, T. Evernote (65 Ways to Use Evernote to Supercharge Your Life).  Amazon Digital Services, January 4, 2014, 35 pages.

Murray, Katherine.  My Evernote.  Que Publishing, Febuary 27, 2012, 256 pages.

O’Neill, Mark. How to Use Evernote: The Unofficial Manual.  Make Use Of, August 31, 2012.

Owens, Jeffrey.  Practical Guide to Evernote (Windows).  Fountainhead Publications, June 8, 2013, 40 pages.

Sarna, D. E. Y. and Richie, V.  Evernote for Dummies. For Dummies, March 16, 2012, 384 pages.

Scaysbrook, G.  Evernote: Wow!  I Didn’t Know It Could Do That. No publisher, sold by Amazon Digital Services. Page numbers unknown.  Published July 16, 2014.

Scott, S. J. Master Evernote: The Unofficial Guide to Organizing Your Life with Evernote.  Archangel Ink, July 5, 2014.

Wolff, D. Master Getting Things Done the David Allen Way with Evernote.  Organized Living Press, August, 2013.

Yilmaz, M.  Evernote for Windows: The Most Comprehensive Guidebook.  Publisher: Murat Yilmaz.  July 17, 2013.

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